Baruch College

Partner Benefits | News |2012-2013 | 2011-2012| 2010-2011

2012 – 2013 Academic Year

Working closely with the Baruch academic community and the Baruch-Rubin Museum Project, we are providing faculty and students opportunities to engage deeply with Himalayan art, culture and sacred traditions, in the form of customized faculty tours, peer-to-peer student mentoring, and a dynamic Faculty Fellows program that creates curricula inspired by museum collections from inter-disciplinary perspectives.


Partner Benefits

All students, faculty, staff, and alumni may visit the museum for free for one year (July 1, 2012- June 30, 2013) by showing a valid university or alumni ID at the Admissions desk.


News

December
Curricular Connections with the Baruch Faculty Fellows

September
Tibetan Monks Build Traditional Sand Mandala at Baruch College
A Sand Mandala at Baruch College

August
Mentoring the Mentors from Baruch College


2012-2013 Faculty Fellows

Laurence Kirby, Professor of Mathematics at Baruch College is incorporating Tibetan Buddhist mandalas into his introductory mathematics classes. The mandalas, which represent sacred cosmograms, will be useful to help illustrate the concept of symmetry in mathematics, particularly for non-math majors.

Michelle Wang, Assistant Professor of Cooperative Education Department at BMCC, teaches Career Planning and Business Internship courses. Inspired by the symbolism of the Kalachakra mandala (Wheel of Life), Dr. Wang is developing a workbook for her Career Planning students that asks two questions: To what extent can a sacred work of art, such as the Kalachakra mandala, empower students to seek their true vocations in life? How does object-based learning influence students’ in their career search preparation?

Cristina Balboa, Assistant Professor of Sociology, School of Public Affairs, Baruch College, CUNY, is developing course units that study how communities interact with the Rubin Museum. She is interested in posing the following questions: what do the Museum’s collections tell us about the Himalayan Asian communities who made them and how are these objects interpreted within the context of a museum setting?

Susan Opotow, Professor, Department of Sociology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, examines culture and social interaction and organization. Her students will visit the museum to explore modes of understanding and intersections between an individual and her/his environment. During their visits, they will explore and appreciate aesthetic, social, historical, and religious legacies of Himalayan Asia within the context of world cultures.

Wendy Raver, Lecturer, Program in Religion, Hunter College, looks forward to strengthening her personal interest in religious interconnections between world cultures and will encourage Hunter College faculty to across the curriculum to teach courses that do not usually incorporate the arts through working with the Rubin Museum’s collections.

Andrea Balis, John Jay College, lecturer, History Department and Interdisciplinary Studies Program, was awarded a study grant for fall of 2012. Her research interests are pedagogy, particularly the role of reflection in undergraduate education. She is developing a methodology for museum visitation that is student-learner centered and will be useful for faculty.

Wen-shing Chou, Assistant Professor of Art History, Hunter College was awarded a study grant for spring 2013. A specialist of Buddhist art of China and Himalayan Asia, she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses with a focus on the art of East and South Asian religions. She plans to design a year-long course that will allow students to curate an exhibition at the Hunter Art Gallery inspired by the Rubin Museum’s collections.


 

2011 – 2012 Academic Year

News

April 2012
The Asian Studies Circle Meets with Dr. Karen Shelby
Museums as “About Something” or “For Somebody” by Faculty Fellow Don Wasianen

March 2012
Cultural Borrowing on Display by Donna Gitter, Faculty Fellow
Himalayan Debate Styles and Cosmopolitan Communication (part 2) by Faculty Fellow Don Wasianen

February 2012
Himalayan Debate Styles and Cosmopolitan Communication (part 1) by Faculty Fellow Don Wasianen
Museums, New Technologies, and Rhetorical Reinventions by Faculty Fellow Don Wasianen

December 2011
What do Teaching, Baseball, and Himalayan Art Highlight about Great Communication by Faculty Fellow Don Waisanen

November 2011
Baruch Peer Mentors Lead Rubin Museum Visits
What does 13th Century Storytelling have in Common with 21st Century Power Points by Faculty Fellow Don Waisanen

October 2011
SEEK Mentors Lead First Peer Guided Tour

Baruch College & Rubin Museum featured in CUNY Matters Article

September 2011
The Rubin Museum of Art Welcomes SEEK Peer Mentors

August 2011
Baruch Peer Mentors Practice Leading Museum Visits
University Guidebook to the Rubin Museum developed by Baruch College

Baruch Peer Mentor Educational Development


2011-2012 Faculty Fellows

Katherine Behar is an Assistant Professor of New Media in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts in the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. Her research interests include embodiment and technology, technologized labor, cyborgian ethics, emerging and obsolete technologies, and feminist media critique. She received her MFA from Hunter College, City University of New York.

Amy Estes is Lecturer in Arts Administration at the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. She is developing a new Master of Arts program in Arts Administration to be housed in Baruch’s Department of Fine and Performing Arts, and drawing on faculty and resources in Weissman as well as the Zicklin School of Business and the School of Public Affairs. She received an M.F.A. in Theatre Management from the University of Alabama.

Professor Donna Gitter is an Associate Professor of Law at the Zicklin School of Business.  Her research analyzes the legal, economic, and ethical issues arising from biotechnology patenting, and takes a comparative approach by examining the legal regimes in the United States and the European Union.  She earned her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School and her B.A. in Government from Cornell University, Phi Beta Kappa and cum laude.

Professor Zoë Sheehan Saldaña is Associate Professor in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts. She creates images, objects, and situations that explore the shifting value of the handmade in art and consumer culture, the imperfect and often additive nature of copying and reproduction, and the multiple roles of the audience in the art experience. Her work has been shown and reviewed in the U.S. and internationally. She received her MFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1998.

 Dr. Don Waisanen is an Assistant Professor in the School of Public Affairs and teaches courses in political communication and public advocacy. Dr. Waisanen’s research focuses on rhetoric and public affairs, political comedy, and the intersections of deliberative democracy, social movements, and civic identities. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California, and has long enjoyed and been informed in his professional work by hobbies in the performing arts.

2010 – 2011 Academic Year

News

May 2011
Baruch College Student Essay Winners Announced

November 2010
Panel Discussion with Author Charles Lee

 


2010-2011 Faculty Fellows

Dr. Katrin Hansing is Associate Professor of Black and Hispanic Studies at the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. An anthropologist, Dr. Hansing has spent the last thirteen years conducting research in the Caribbean, especially Cuba, and Southern Africa. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Oxford.

Dr. Carla Bellamy is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Bellamy’s interests include religion and healing, religious identity and conflict, and misfortune and magic. She received her Ph.D. in South Asian Religion from Columbia University.

Dr. David Hoffman is an Associate Professor in the School of Public Affairs. His research interests explore the intersection of rhetoric, history and politics. Dr. Hoffman received his Ph.D. in Communication Studies from the University of Iowa in 2000.

Dr. Jerry Mitchell is a professor in the School of Public Affairs and teaches courses in American government and urban economic development. Dr. Mitchell’s research focuses on public authorities, business improvement districts, and parks conservancies. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas.

Dr. Karen Shelby is an Assistant Professor of Art History in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts in the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. She teaches courses in Asian art and museum studies. She received her Ph.D. from The City University of New York, The Graduate Center.

Dr. Lilia Ziamou is Associate Professor of Marketing in the Zicklin School of Business and the Weissman School of Arts and Sciences. Her research interests include innovation and design, new product adoption, technology marketing, and consumer decision-making.

 

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